DEDICATED TO BREASTMILK

FAMILY LARSSON-ROSENQUIST FOUNDATION

The Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation was established in 2013, born from the vision of a world in which every child is granted an optimum start in life through the benefits of breastmilk.

Based in Frauenfeld, Switzerland, it is one of the world’s only philanthropic foundations dedicated entirely to supporting and promoting breastfeeding and breastmilk.

Backed by sound science, its objective is to drive changes in practice that will increase rates of breastfeeding, and improve the health of mothers and children worldwide. It furthers this objective by contributing to the long-term discovery, dissemination and deployment of evidence-based knowledge.

Together with a global network of leading experts, it is creating publicly available, sustainable resources and educational tools that help healthcare providers, governments, communities and families overcome obstacles and achieve their breastfeeding goals.

LATEST NEWS

Discover the latest in breastfeeding and breastmilk – from new, publicly available resources to critical research findings.

Our partners are leading experts in their fields, all working to educate and empower, and improve the health of mothers and babies worldwide. Learn more about how your patients, organisation or community can benefit from these science-driven advances.  

Please sign up for our newsletter to keep current on these and related news posts.

CONTEXT MATTERS, ESPECIALLY WHEN IT COMES TO ETHICS

Are you involved in health or breastfeeding research or implementation? You might find this Journal of Medical Ethics blog post helpful. From the Ethics in Health and Breastfeeding Research Webinar Series, offering practical insights and guidance on ethics application from international experts working in diverse health settings.

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NEW CLUES TO ID PRETERM INFANTS AT RISK?

A pilot study just uncovered differences in gut metabolites between preterm babies born to mothers with and without asthma. It could lay the groundwork for identifying children in neonatal intensive care units who are vulnerable to allergy and asthma – and for developing interventions to reduce the risk.  

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HAPPY INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY!

‘Gender equality for a sustainable tomorrow’ is this year’s theme, and we are celebrating contributions from women leading the charge. We asked Dr Alecia-Jane Twigger, a scientist we are privileged to engage with, about her work to improve maternal and infant health. Her story is inspiring …

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WHAT IS ONE OF THE BIGGEST BARRIERS TO BREASTFEEDING?

Returning to work. Which is why this just-published analysis of breastfeeding policies at 14 workplaces in Mexico could serve as a guide for creating breastfeeding-friendly work environments. Researchers talked to mothers, managers and other personnel, identifying three contextual factors as the most effective to overcoming this barrier …  

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MILK CELLS PROVIDE NEW INSIGHT INTO THE LACTATING BREAST

Scientists have found a new way to see how human breast tissue changes during lactation – by looking at mammary cells in breastmilk. What they saw could aid in understanding milk production and how this impacts long-term breast cancer risk. Their groundbreaking work has just been published in Nature Communications.

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HMOS: BROAD-SPECTRUM ANTIBIOTIC ALTERNATIVES?

Pregnant women with Group B Streptococcus often take antibiotics to protect their newborns from bacterial infections that can cause preterm birth, serious disease and even death. Yet researchers have found human milk oligosaccharides may be just as effective – without the side effects.  

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NEW DEVICE COULD REVOLUTIONISE HMO ANALYSIS

First came collaboration, then came innovation. A research project fostered by MOMI CORE could forever change how human milk oligosaccharides – crucial for infant development – are assessed at the point of care.  

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NEWLY RELEASED IN GERMAN

Breastfeeding and Breast Milk – from Biochemistry to Impact: the breastfeeding reference book by 30 leading experts is now available in German on LactaHub. 

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WHAT HAPPENS WHEN BREASTFEEDING MOTHERS TAKE ANTIBIOTICS?

Thanks to a USD 6.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine will launch a collaborative Center of Excellence in Therapeutics to study the effects of maternal antibiotic use on breastmilk and infant health.  

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HOW MUCH ZINC AND IRON ARE BREASTFED INFANTS RECEIVING?

Researchers measured the quantitative supply of these micronutrients – crucial for metabolism, immunity and brain development – to breastfed infants during a critical developmental window to find out. Their findings published open access offer an opportunity to address two global public health challenges: stunting and iron deficiency anemia.

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BREASTMILK: A KEY TO PREVENTING ALLERGIES?

Babies exposed to allergens via breastmilk may benefit from immune system ‘instruction’ that prevents allergies from developing, according to global research led by the Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation Centre for Immunology and Breastfeeding at The University of Western Australia and the Telethon Kids Institute.

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HAPPY INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY!

The UN Women’s vision of an equal future includes healthcare services that meet the needs of all women. We are excited to report that LactaHub is contributing with a resource to help health professionals meet the specific needs of lactating and breastfeeding women: LactaMedia – A Clinical Image Collection. The emerging, open access collection of educational photos and videos is appropriate for training, presenting and assisting patients.

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WHAT IS THE COST OF NOT BREASTFEEDING IN INDONESIA?

Billions per year, researchers estimate. This new costing study in the International Breastfeeding Journal shows how expanding paid maternity leave is not only economically attractive, but has the potential to boost breastfeeding rates and save the lives of mothers and children.

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THE STARK STATE OF BREASTFEEDING IN CONFLICT SETTINGS … AND WAYS FORWARD

Displacement, stress, maternal malnutrition, family casualties, free distribution of breastmilk substitutes: all compromise breastfeeding where it is urgently needed to protect children from malnutrition and infection. Research findings from Aga Khan University and the Hospital for Sick Children, supported by the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation, have just been published in BMJ Open.

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NEW TRAINING COMPENDIUM ON LIFESAVING MOTHERS’ OWN MILK

Rush University Medical Center, with support from the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation, launches PROVIDE – A Training Compendium on Providing Mothers’ Own Milk in NICU Settings, to help healthcare professionals bring this lifesaving intervention to infants in intensive care worldwide.     

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CASE STUDY: MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH SERVICES IN AFGHANISTAN AMID LONG-TERM CONFLICT

Aga Khan University and the Hospital for Sick Children, supported in part by the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation, report national resiliency despite the ongoing unrest that has compromised the delivery of health services, and offer recommendations for improvement. Details are in Conflict and Health, as part of a series by members and partners of the BRANCH Consortium (Bridging Research and Action in Conflict Settings for the Health of Women and Children), made available for open access by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

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HEALTH INTERVENTIONS FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN IN CONFLICT SETTINGS: A NEW CASE STUDY FROM PAKISTAN

The BMC journal Conflict and Health has just published details on maternal and child health in Pakistan, conducted with researchers from Aga Khan University and funded in part by the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation. It is one of a series of case studies conducted by members and partners of the BRANCH Consortium (Bridging Research and Action in Conflict Settings for the Health of Women and Children) and made available for open access by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

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NOW IN HEALTH FACILITIES AND COMMUNITIES IN ARGENTINA AND KENYA – INTERPRACTICE-21st (IP21) FOR PRETERM INFANTS

Neonatal healthcare settings in Buenos Aires and Lodwar, Kenya are now getting acquainted with the IP21 Project. Designed to promote optimal postnatal growth of preterm infants until 6 months of age, the international preterm growth standards and evidence-based feeding recommendations are coordinated by the University of Oxford in collaboration with Harvard University, with support from the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation.

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ANTIBIOTICS OR NOT? STUDY RESULTS COMING SOON IN THE LANCET GLOBAL HEALTH

Findings from a randomised controlled study conducted by the University of KwaZulu-Natal, with support from the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation, have the potential to change the current practice of giving fully breastfed HIV-exposed but uninfected infants antibiotics to protect them from childhood infectious illnesses and mortality.

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TWO SCIENTISTS WIN 2019 TEP TRAINEE TRAVEL FUNDS

The International Society for Research in Human Milk and Lactation (ISRHML), supported by the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation, awards Trainee Travel Funds from Trainee Expansion Program (TEP) of up to CHF 10,000 to two young talents to advance their current research into breastmilk.

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HOW TO ACHIEVE BETTER BRESTFEEDING OUTCOMES AFTER C-SECTIONS – CLINICAL STUDY UNDERWAY

The University Children’s Hospital Basel, in close cooperation with the University Hospital of Zurich and with support from the University Hospital Basel, Cantonal Hospital Baden, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen and the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation, investigates whether the mild induction of labour before caesarean sections helps infant primary adaptation, bonding and lactation, resulting in improved neonatal and maternal outcomes.

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WORLD’S FIRST CENTRE FOR BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS OF BREASTFEEDING ENDOWED IN SWITZERLAND

What empowers women to breastfeed? What obstacles to successful breastfeeding do women, families or even entire communities encounter? What are the causal effects of breastfeeding on child development and family dynamics? Researchers will tackle these and other consequential questions at the Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation Center for Economics of Breastfeeding (LRF CEB), established by the University of Zurich and the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation.

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BUILDING BREASTFEEDING-FRIENDLY COUNTRIES

Eight countries and counting have implemented Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly (BBF): A Guide to Global Scale-Up, to increase breastfeeding rates around the world. Developed by the Yale School of Public Health, with support from the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation.

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A NATURAL GIFT

breastmilk

The birth of each baby is a magical moment, a miracle of new life. Nature has provided well, furnishing mothers with the opportunity to nourish their infants with their own milk – a natural, life-giving gift. Breastmilk is unrivalled in nutritional completeness and benefits for both mothers and children. There is simply no substitute. Breastmilk is not just nutrition for newborns, it is also a virtual umbilical cord that provides babies with everything needed for optimal development after birth.

This is why the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation dedicates all of its energy and activities to supporting and promoting breastfeeding and breastmilk.

We work with leading experts to improve understanding of the factors empowering women to breastfeed, and facilitate the creation of publicly available, sustainable resources and educational tools that help healthcare providers, governments, communities and families foster environments that advance breastfeeding in practice.

The FLRF vision is a world in which every child is granted an optimum start in life through the benefits of breastmilk.

Please join the Foundation as we pursue this vision with wholehearted passion and long-term commitment: a world in which every child is granted an optimum start in life through the benefits of breastmilk.

OPEN ACCESS RESOURCES

for decision makers, practitioners and researchers

Check here for a selection of freely available evidence-based resources. Developed by or in collaboration with our partners at world-leading organisations, universities and research centres, these valuable tools and educational materials are designed to cultivate thriving, sustainable breastfeeding environments and robust maternal and child health programmes.

LactaHub – A resource for evidence-based breastfeeding intelligence
This open access knowledge platform provides scientific and evidence-based information to help health professionals, decision-makers and researchers be more effective in their daily work. LactaHub is a partnership project with The Global Health Network (University of Oxford).

LactaMap – An online lactation care support system
Evidence-based and developed with The University of Western Australia to help healthcare providers resolve breastfeeding challenges and ensure consistent care for breastfeeding mothers and their infants. Included is LactaPedia – A glossary of lactation for science and medicine and go-to source for standardised, research-based terminology on lactation, breastfeeding and breastmilk.

LactaMedia – A Clinical Image Collection on LactaHub
Newly updated and ready for health professionals at its new home. The 100-plus and growing collection of educational photos and videos of lactating women, often with their breastfeeding infants, is appropriate for training, presenting and assisting patients. Images depict specific topics like breastfeeding positions, breast variations, stages of breastmilk or anatomical challenges of mother or infant. Each is IBCLC reviewed and approved and exclusively for nonprofit, educational, medical or scientific use.

Becoming Breastfeeding Friendly (BBF): A Guide to Global Scale-Up
This evidence-informed global initiative from the Yale School of Public Health targets data-driven, concrete measures countries can take to sustainably increase breastfeeding rates. The BBF process helps countries identify the strength of their breastfeeding environment and develop recommendations and plans to scale up their breastfeeding policies and programmes.

Breastfeeding and Breast Milk – from Biochemistry to Impact
The evidence-based reference book presents a holistic, scientifically robust overview from 30 leading experts in medicine, sociology, political science, culture, economics and more. Free online or via PDF in English and German, Breastfeeding and Breast Milk explores the influence of breastfeeding and breastmilk on children’s health and development, and is a valuable resource for decision-makers and health professionals alike.

EFBRI – An Evolving Ethical Framework Informing Breastfeeding Research and Interventions
Built by the University of Zurich to streamline research processes for people working with breastfeeding mothers and children, it compiles ethical principles from established international standards. The aim is to help researchers align their work to universal research ethics standards confidently and efficiently and safeguard the rights and dignity of everyone involved in breastfeeding and lactation research.

INTERGROWTH-21st Preterm Postnatal Growth Standards and Feeding Protocol 
Globally validated growth standards, feeding protocols, clinical tools and practical training materials – all created to improve preterm infant health outcomes. The package was produced by the International Fetal and Newborn Growth Consortium for the 21st Century, a global, multidisciplinary network of more than 300 researchers and clinicians worldwide, and coordinated by the University of Oxford.

PROVIDE – A Training Compendium on Providing Mothers’ Own Milk in NICU Settings
Produced by Rush University Medical Center, the evidence-based educational resource is designed to help healthcare professionals implement lifesaving mothers’ own milk feeding practices for infants in intensive care worldwide. It covers MOM feeding and lactation care essentials with information sheets (in English and Spanish) and videos.

A Resource Toolkit for Establishing and Integrating Human Milk Banks
Compiled by a group of international experts, this compendium of standards and best practices can help communities set up and operate safe, high-quality and sustainable human milk banks – a lifesaving alternative for babies that lack access to their own mothers’ milk. The toolkit can guide implementation of human milk banks as integrated programmes within existing newborn and nutrition programming, to improve survival and long-term health for vulnerable infants.

aha! Swiss Allergy Centre
Offers a wealth of educational information about the causes, prevention and treatment of allergies and intolerances, and breastfeeding’s leading role in allergy prevention. Resources for healthcare professionals and the general public are available, covering topics such as allergies/intolerances, asthma, eczema/skin reactions.